Oceanbird cargo ship cuts emissions 90%

Oceanbird cargo ship cuts emissions

Caption: Oceanbird cargo ship cuts emissions 90%

Oceanbird cargo ship cuts emissions 90% using an old-fashioned trick. This new ship is in development now is designed to help to cross the Atlantic in less than 2 weeks. It will use huge wing-like sails to run on wind power.

Ulysse Dhomé, a researcher at Sweden’s KTH Royal Institute of Technology said, “Wind is there—we don’t need to produce anything, With most alternative fuels, you need to either produce the fuel or transform the energy, whereas the wind is just there, and there’s a lot of it.”

The design uses 260-foot-tall rigs made of steel and composite—more like airplane wings than traditional cloth sails—that can rise up and turn to optimally catch the wind. The huge size of the ship, at more than 650 feet long, meant that the sails also had to be large so that it could keep moving even in light winds. The hull of the ship is also different than a typical cargo ship and may use fins, like a smaller sailboat, to compensate for the sideways movement from the sails. When it comes into a harbor, the ship will revert to fuel. But the overall design can reduce emissions by 90%.